STORIES ABOUT OUR FOOD

  BAK KUT TEH  (pork bone tea)

BAK KUT TEH (pork bone tea)

BAK KUT TEH

Known in Chinese as “pork bone tea,” the soup originated in 19th century Klang, a port town in Malaysia. Coolies or the laborers would enjoy a bowl of this fragrant, herbal soup with noodles as breakfast. The only tea associated with the soup itself is the cup of Oolong tea that accompanies the meal.

Three variations can be found throughout Malaysia, Singapore and Taiwan: 

Teochew - clean, lighter broth with a more pronounced garlic and pepper taste

Hokkien - a darker, more fragrant full-bodied soy-sauce based broth

Cantonese - additional medicinal herbs are added to the broth creating a stronger flavored soup

At SING, you can enjoy Teochew Bak Kut Teh.  Pork ribs are simmered for hours with dried herbs and spices like star anise, cinnamon, coriander seeds, fennel seeds and garlic. The aromatic broth is served with rice vermicelli, fresh cilantro, Thai basil and fried shallots.

Turn the volume up with a dollop of house-made chili sate oil.

 
  Dan Dan Noodles  or dandan mian is served dry, not soupy and packs a tingly Sichuan peppercorn punch.

Dan Dan Noodles or dandan mian is served dry, not soupy and packs a tingly Sichuan peppercorn punch.

DAN DAN NOODLES

Named after the poles used by street food vendors to carry this dish, "dan dan" is one of the most popular items in Sichuan cuisine. The ingredients are affordable, the dish, easy to make, so it easily became known as "peddler's noodles" or literally translated: "noodles carried on a pole".

Our version is presented with rice noodles, ya cai (preserved mustard stems), ground pork, freshly ground Sichuan peppercorn powder and our house-made garlic chili sambal.